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20121027
20121104
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KQED (PBS) 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be a big moment with bill clinton rolling out the big guns, if you like, and that was all canceled rather suddenly just as we woke up. so it was really strange knowing he was flying back to cope with a crisis while the rally went on and the normal things you hear at these rallies, the political campaign was going on. and the storm was mentioned by bill clinton but really not heavily. only in passing. and i think people are obviously talking about it to a certain extent. it's not in the front of their minds. what it does politically, conventional campaigning has ceased. it takes the two candidates off the media. i don't think people will be interested in them anyway. the normal style of campaigning has stopped. i don't mean politics has stopped. i think this is an important political moment. but the normal stuff of campaigning is over for a few days at least. >> bridgette kendall in cleveland, ohio. ohio only on the edge of hurricane sandy but right at the center of america's political storm. what do they think the impact on mitt romney's campaign is going to be there? >> the winds and rai
travel for three days, his surrogate was bill clinton who is about as good as a surrogate to get out there and get the base -- >> they did not stop trying to win votes in those states. gwen: this week we saw talk of an expanded map. pennsylvania, minnesota. is that true? >> it's not going to work. they can try it. gwen: republicans are saying we can win pennsylvania. >> do i believe it's tighter than it was earlier? gwen: yes. >> i do. but is it going to shrink fast enough? no. partly because when you think about those states, what do they have in common? the democratics of those states is much -- demographics of those states is much more towards romney. there has been very little work done to sort of laying the groundwork. >> it may be slightly more likely than jim mussina's plan a year ago to expand the map into arizona and georgia, but not a lot more. gwen: the other question i have for your guys, is so how late are we going to be up on tuesday? >> i think we'll know by midnight. >> you think? >> yep. >> wow, that is very good. i hope that is true. i don't feel like we've known at
backward on that. in the 1990s bill clinton raised exactly the high income tax rates that barack obama wants to return the rates to. and the 2000s which he did not mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, they actually added more than 1 million fewer private sector jobs if george bush's first term than president obama has under his first term so i really do not think that the basic economics or the history says that just going back to deregulation and high rate-- high income rate cuts is the thing that leads to growth. >> brown: and do you think professor -- >> two decades of strong growth, we saw two decade, 80ous and 90s with extraordinary growth. economists called it the great moderation long boom and that's because the stable policies are put in place. tax reform, if you like, of 1986. a bipartisan reform president reagan worked with democrats in congress, that is the kind of thing we nude to get the strong economy back. >> back to you pfessor goolsbee, just this question about -- >> i agree with that i think tax reform and a gra
can tell part of the story, thanks to bill clinton, which is, "they gave me a problem and i stopped what they were doing. now you don't want to give it back to the people who caused the problem." but what he is not then able to do, which i wish he would do, is to say, "and the reason it was so hard for me to do as much as i wanted, and the reason i need your help, america, going forward, is that these people are going to fight us tooth and nail every step of the way. and starting with dealing with this fiscal cliff in which there's this terrible sequester deal, those people are holding the country hostage. i'm going to go to you, the country, and ask you to pressure your representatives, including the republicans, to make a deal, find common ground with us. and that's what it's going be like in the future." obama has not made a convincing case that the way in which the non-part -- the way in which the bitter partisanship of the past would be different from the future. why wouldn't mitch mcconnell and john boehner be even more vicious toward him in the future, and ferociously so than
and a center piece of mr. obama's campaign. former president bill clinton who will visit ohio next week with the president pointed to the plant's success as this summer's democratic party conventions in charlotte. >> the auto industry restructuring worked. it saved-- it saved more than a million jobs, and not just at gm, chrysler and their dealerships, but in auto parts manufacturing all over the country. >> reporter: today the lords town plant churns ou the chevrolet cruz, the country's best selling compaq car, to meet demands it's gone from one shift a day to three, and round-the-clock production. dave green is president of the local united auto workers union. >> but the whole economy will benefit from this because our parts suppliers, the people who work there are out shopping at the stores, they are paying tacks, you know, they're investing in their community. >> reporter: the auto industry employs one out of every eight workers in the state. youngstown is the largest city in the region and reaped many of the benefits. it's not just auto breathing new life into northeast ohio. in yo
, michelle obama, bill clinton. their campaigns have continued to run advertising. we've seen solicitations for contributions not to the obama campaign but to the red cross from that massive email list that barack obama has. the campaigns were up and running. they're still doing all the things they normally do. there's a little more sensitivity in the states that are affected by the hurricane but they can't really afford to pull out, to push the pause button. >> ifill: democrats have been saying that mitt romney during the republican primary debates may have said that he would actually cut back on fema which is not as unpopular as it once was. >> he said he wanted to move as much of that responsibility to the states and to private contributions as possible. so he's getting hit for that right now. what would mitt romney's fema look like? would it be as well funded as the current organization? there's about $7 billion in the bank right now. if mitt romney and republicans were in control in congress there is a question as to how they would handle disaster relief. generally speaking they've not
. >> rose: not only that -- bill clinton is out there as the surrogate. >> and he has his campaign apparatus and advertising and the ground game. news coverage will be affected if this storm hadn't happened we would see wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting punishes to a presidential election in a television age we won't see as much of that, certainly through the weekend which means whichever candidate was going to benefit more from national coverage is going to lose compared to what it would have been like, i am not sure which candidate that was going to be. >> rose: exactly right. >> in the states which matter, particularly ohio which continues to be really the key to the election, there is going to be plenty of coverage, they were not that affected by the storm, with all due respect to the sympathies and empathy of the people of ohio i think they are going to be more focused on the presidential election, in the northeast there are a lot more focus on the storm and really only one or two battle ground states truly impacted by the storm, virginia and new hampshire, perhaps, and
-up states around the country. former president bill clinton has hit the trail hard, appearing today in wisconsin and ohio on behalf of the president. >> but i am far more enthusiastic four years ago. >> woodruff: clinton was in minnesota earlier in the week, where the romney campaign recently announced a new ad buy. it's a place both sides had earlier assumed would belong to the democrats. the obama camp countered with a new ad featuring the endorsement of former secretary of state colin powell, ran it there and in nine other states. >> i think we ought to keep on the track that we're on. >> i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> woodruff: but the romney campaign also began airing a spanish-language ad in florida tying obama to latin american dictators hugo chavez and fidel castro. >> we are america's women. >> woodruff: and american future fund, a super pac supporting romney is running ads targeting women in michigan and pennsylvania, states considered safely democratic. as you can see on the "newshour's" vote 2012 map center" there are seven states currently considered by
an identifier as who we were. we were the choom gang. >> bill clinton, you know, famously said he didn't inhale. obama, on the other hand, not only inhaled but was sort of the ringleader of the idea of total absorption, what they call ta, where you had to make sure that everything got inhaled. take roof hits while you're in the car. >> i think it was important to barry because perhaps it did fill a void that wasn't apparent at the time. i don't think any of us thought of it that way, but now in retrospect, we look back and went, hey, we really were a family. this was really, really cool. >> narrator: obama's senior yearbook tells the story. >> in his yearbook he thanks "gramps and toot," who are stan and madeline, his grandparents, and the choom gang, and ray for the good times. who was their drug dealer. who was kind of a hippie who could get them the good stuff. and he doesn't thank his mother. >> narrator: by the time he graduated from punahou, obama had decided to leave hawaii. >> one of the central themes that i find from his life is his intense desire to avoid being trapped. his mother ha
american democracy." the author is bill ivey, former chairman of the national endowment for the arts in the clinton administration. he's now director of vanderbilt university's "u.s.-china center for education and culture." jeffrey brown recently sat down with him. . >> welcome. good to be here. brown: i want to put aside politics for a moment because you're making an argument about a crisis in american culture, excessive consumerism, misplaced values. explain what you're seeing. >> what i first saw a few years ago was a huge transformation in the way americans work and live. brought about by forces that are larger than our own society, globalization, the reach of technology and changing demographics. and within that, i felt that america was at a time when we desperately needed to have the strongest possible value space. we needed to be more in touch with the best of the american idea, the best aspects of the american idea. >> brown: value space you say. well, i say the value space. the space where we talk about why we do things, not what we're going to do. i felt that space had empt
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)